From Stonewall to the Women's World Cup

In a summer where there is more than enough hard news to go around, this Sunday's victory by the US team at the Women's World Cup is a wonderful cause for celebration in and of itself! If it had just been a win by the US Women's Soccer Team, with a couple of Seattle players in pivotal roles, dayeinu, it would have been enough! But it was so much more than that, and a great reminder of what we're trying to embody here at Kavana.

In a summer where there is more than enough hard news to go around, this Sunday's victory by the US team at the Women's World Cup is a wonderful cause for celebration in and of itself! If it had just been a win by the US Women's Soccer Team, with a couple of Seattle players in pivotal roles, dayeinu, it would have been enough! But it was so much more than that, and a great reminder of what we're trying to embody here at Kavana.

Megan Rapinoe's leadership, on the field and off, as an out lesbian star player makes Sunday's victory a joyful cap to the Pride season. 50 years ago, routine police harassment of LGBTQ people led to them to fight back in what has become regarded as a beginning of the movement for LGBTQ equality, commemorated with Pride. We have come so far -- the levels of inclusion and (in some places) protection of rights that we take for granted in Seattle and Kavana today were unthinkable when Stonewall occurred. And yet, the same transgender people -- especially transgender women of color -- who led the charge at Stonewall are still vulnerable to shocking levels of violence, discrimination, and poverty. There is much more to do.

And Rapinoe's leadership around equal pay for women soccer players -- culminating in the inspiring chants of "Equal Pay" when her team won, part of another struggle that has come so far and is still sorely needed -- is a reminder that fun and politics, joy and righteous indignation, are never really far apart. Every victory or moment of joy can fuel our struggle for more justice; every injustice reminds us of the need to remain grateful and joyful even in hard times.

This is what a community like Kavana is all about -- holding and nurturing the joys and the struggles, the light moments and the moments for indignation, and recognizing that they are all part of what it means to be a community, what it means to be human. Read on to learn about a summer at Kavana that is full of opportunities to live out both parts of what our tradition calls us to do -- celebrate life and pursue justice -- beginning this Friday with the Shabbat Lights for Liberty vigil to protest immigrant detention camps.